Carmen and The Hallucinogenic Toreador

Portrait of Carmen


Portrait of Escamillo


A Place in Seville


Rendez-Vous of the Smugglers


Love is like a Gypsy


Carmen Sings Gypsy Songs


The Habanera


Outside the Arena: The Fruit Vendor


The Harpist’s Allegory of Carmen’s Love


Lillias Pastis’s Tavern


Tribute to Escamillo


Awaiting the Fray


The Bird is Flown


The Bull is Dead


The Cards Spell Death to Carmen


Carmen and Don Jose Fleeing on Horseback


Whoever Carries off Carmen


Carmen’s Death


Don Jose’s Flower Song


Don Jose’s Last Appearance


The illustrated suite Carmen by Salvador Dalí, consists of 25 lithographs on various papers. They were produced in 1968.


El torero alucinógeno (Hallucinogenic Toreador), Salvador Dalí, 1968-1970. In this piece, Dalí transmits his wife’s dislike for bullfighting


The time is the late 1960s, and with Hallucinogenic Toreador, Salvador Dalí returns to all things Spanish and reveals his fascination with the colorful psychedelic explosion of those mind-bending times. As Sixties’ political rebellion gives way to Seventies’ decadence, we find the Spanish master undertaking his famous Carmen series of colored lithographs, published in 1970. The brigands, gypsies, and smugglers, who form the cast of this most beloved of operas, are the perfect counterpoint to Dalí’s increasingly distracting wealth and fame.

Dalí would depict the bullfight numerous times throughout his career and George Bizet‘s opera, set in Seville and featuring the toreador Escamillo in a primary role, provides Dalí with an ideal context in which to explore this most Spanish pastime. We illustrate here the complete suite of 25 hand-signed lithographs and believe you will agree that it is one of the most exquisite Dalínian triumphs of color and vivacity.

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