Fascinated by the Shape of Butterflies

“….I was practically born holding a pen between my fingers, I started tracing shapes which recalled women’s legs at an age when female anatomy was not at all interesting to me. Probably I was not more than five or six years old. I think that it all came from the fact that when I was a child I loved to leaf through the Paris fashion magazines my mother left scattered around the house: of course they had illustrations of women sometimes wearing lingerie or see-through negligées (…) I was fascinated by shapes, lines, graphic signs which lured my observing and precocious eye…”

Renè Gruau
1994

 
 

Undated Gruau’s illustrations

 
 

Eisenberg Originals Butterfly-Printed Tulle Stole, Evening Gown, 1951

 
 

Crescendoe Gloves Advertisement, circa 1954

 
 

Advertising for Cori, 1959

 
 

“A butterfly surrounded with a thick tissue of the Maison Givenchy, thus creating a beautiful costume especially for Audrey Hepburn.” International Textiles, edition of December 1966. The actress Audrey Hepburn portrayed by René Gruau in Paris (France), after the filming of How to Steal a Million (William Wyler, 1966), in November 1965. This illustration is also known as Lady Butterfly

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Best Recognized from Above

Emblemata-Butterfly, 1938

 
 

Butterflies, 1950

 
 

Circle Limit with Butterflies, 1950

 
 

Symmetry Watercolor 70 Butterfly, undated

 
 

In 1948, the Dutch artist Maurits Cornelis Escher created his Regular Division Drawing number 70, a repeating Euclidean pattern of butterflies.Escher was well known for his repeating patterns, which had two characteristics: they filled the plane without gaps or overlaps, and they exhibited color symmetry. M. C. Escher became fascinated with the geometric processes of tessellation and his imagery took a biased towards asymmetrical natural forms of which insects were often his subject matter. He made the comment that insects are generally best recognized from above.